cbd and dry eyes

December 15, 2021 By admin Off

As marijuana has become more popular and many states have legalized both medical and recreational uses for this drug, CBD oil is being promoted for a range of uses, including as a glaucoma treatment.

There are very few medical studies on the effectiveness of CBD or medical marijuana, although the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has information on potentially beneficial uses for this approach to treatment. They have approved one CBD-based drug for two types of severe, rare epilepsy. Some forms of medical marijuana have been examined to treat eye conditions, especially glaucoma, but newer research suggests that CBD is not an effective treatment for your eyes.

CBD has become a touted treatment for various issues, including glaucoma. This is based on older medical studies and anecdotal reports that CBD oil, eye drops, and other forms of medical marijuana help to ease anxiety, eye strain, and eye pressure.

Using Medical Marijuana Like CBD for Your Eyes Does Not Work.

Some dispensaries hype CBD for the eyes aside from glaucoma treatment, suggesting that it can ease pain from surgery, reduce dry eye, and even alleviate eye strain. However, there are no medical studies to back up these claims. The changes to eye pressure due to CBD may lead to damage to your vision, even if you do not have glaucoma.

It is important for you to follow medical advice from your optometrist and ophthalmologist to manage all eye conditions, from dry eyes to glaucoma. Don’t attempt to self-treat any eye issue with CBD.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CBD for some very limited medical uses, and several states have legalized both medical and recreational use of marijuana, both THC and CBD.

A study conducted in 2018 found that THC and CBD regulate eye pressure differently. When they are separated from marijuana, they will have radically different effects.

The only currently approved medical approach for glaucoma is regular eye exams to monitor the condition. Follow your eye doctor’s advice to manage this condition if you are diagnosed with it. This will likely mean eye drops first to prevent vision loss. It could also mean laser eye surgery, drainage devices, or other types of surgery to alleviate intraocular pressure and reduce damage to the optic nerve.

Glaucoma. (July 2020). National Eye Institute (NEI).

Is There a Risk of Blindness With CBD? (2018). United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Medical Studies on CBD & the Eyes Suggests CBD Is a Dangerous Chemical.

NVISION® content is medically reviewed by a licensed Ophthalmologist, Optometrist, Surgeon or Doctor. These vision experts ensure the content is fact-based and up-to-date.

Most medical research suggests that CBD does not intoxicate you the same way THC does, but taking types of medical marijuana marketed as “high CBD” might mean there are traces of THC included in the substance. THC is addictive because it can change brain chemistry to make you feel relaxed, less anxious, sleepy, or even happy. The drug can also cause negative side effects like changes in mood, spikes in anxiety or paranoia, delusions, and trouble thinking or problem-solving.

Treating glaucoma starts with medicated eye drops that are designed to lower intraocular pressure. If these do not work, there are several approaches to surgery that can lower fluid pressure in the eyes and prevent vision loss.

However, the studies also found that these pressure-lowering effects would wear off after a certain amount of time, while the effects of glaucoma eye drop treatment lasted at least 12 hours. It is vital for eye health that treatment to manage intraocular pressure lasts for a long time and is consistent. When eye pressure rises and lowers several times throughout the day, damage to the optic nerve can get worse.

The results of the 2018 study found that a single dose of THC drops lowered IOP by 28 percent for 8 hours in male mice, although humans with glaucoma need 24-hour pressure relief to reduce damage to the optic nerve. The study also found two interesting problems. First, CBD inhibited THC from lowering IOP. Second, the effects of THC on eye pressure were sex-dependent, with male mice receiving noticeably greater benefit from the treatment.

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Dispensaries recommend CBD for eye treatment, especially glaucoma. Medical research has found that medical marijuana does not lower eye pressure for more than three or four hours, which is not long enough to prevent damage to the optic nerve. Paradoxically, it may increase the risk of damage due to fluctuations in eye pressure over the course of the day.

Cannabidiol (CBD) – What We Know and What We Don’t. (August 2018). Harvard Health Publishing, Harvard Medical School.

What Is Marijuana? (December 2019). National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

CBD Oil May Worsen Glaucoma. (February 2019). American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO).

“At true treatment doses of 10–20 mg/kg, CBD can interact with conventional medications and depending on what those are, can be quite dangerous,” Dr. Tishler said.

Research on CBD in the U.S. likely will expand now that it is no longer classified as a Schedule 1 drug, Mr. DeRose said (marijuana is still on the Schedule 1 list from the Drug Enforcement Act). One of many questions that could be explored with further research is what happens in subjects who smoke high-CBD varieties of cannabis, Dr. Straiker said.

Cannabis for glaucoma “is entirely impractical and dangerous,” Dr. Tishler said.

Ophthalmologists may wonder how all this comes back to eye health. Because marijuana has had a long-time association with glaucoma (even if scientific evidence does not back it), medical professionals and patients tend to ponder whether CBD also can improve eye health, be it for glaucoma or other ocular issues.

The use of CBD is most effective as a tincture (placed under the tongue) or vaped, although some consumers dislike the idea of using a vape, Ms. Green said. Jordan Tishler, MD, cautions that research on CBD dosing has shown that you cannot vape enough to get an effective treatment.

About the sources.

In clinical trials, CBD has been shown to be an effective treatment for epilepsy, according to a report from the World Health Organization. 1 Last year, the U.S. FDA approved Epidiolex (GW Pharmaceuticals), a CBD-based drug designed to treat two rare and severe forms of epilepsy. Other CBD-based drugs are under development, including Arvisol (Echo Pharmaceuticals), which is in pre-clinical testing for epilepsy and schizophrenia.

A recently published study that received attention in the consumer press focused on both CBD and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis) and their role in regulating IOP. 4 “Over the last several years, we have determined that three different cannabinoid receptors—CB1, GPR18, and GPR119—each can lower pressure in mice when activated. Once this was established, it made sense to go back to THC and CBD to see how they act,” said Dr. Straiker, one of the study’s co-researchers. Their study provided topical application of both THC and CBD in mice, and researchers found the CBD actually raised IOP. At the same time, THC lowered IOP through a combination of CB1 and GPR18 receptors. The effect of THC was sex-dependent, with longer effects in male mice. Additionally, CBD canceled out the IOP-lowering effects of THC, probably by blocking CB1 receptors, Dr. Straiker said.

On the consumer level, CBD users are reporting that they have found relief from sleep problems, inflammation, and stress and anxiety, according to Brenda Green, MEd. There are also many who purchase CBD oil for pet anxiety or inflammation, she added. Some parents are trying CBD for attention deficit disorder in their children.

“CBD is a very common topic of ongoing education throughout Colorado,” said Antonio DeRose. “This has helped reduce negative stigma and spread positive awareness for several medicinal properties, which in turn is leading more people to turn to CBD over certain prescriptions and over-the-counter medications.” However, Dr. Tishler said that this can be dangerous if done without regard to a patient’s actual medical care.

Cannabidiol has few side effects. Some studies have noted fatigue, diarrhea, and change in appetite, but these are considered rare, Ms. Morrison said.

Brenda Green, MEd CBD specialist Sarasota, Florida.

Samantha Morrison Cannabis researcher Glacier Wellness New York.

Dr. Clifton also recommends tinctures or vaping and steers patients away from edibles, which can take longer to be effective.

For those who want to delve deeper into CBD use, it’s important to learn more about dosing. Ms. Green advises CBD users to start “low and slow” but also noted that it’s easy to get the dosing wrong, which is why users should buy from retailers with extensive product knowledge. Product quality is also key. There are a lot of CBD products entering the market, but that does not necessarily mean they are all effective, Ms. Green said.

Marijuana use for glaucoma not effective.

A 2016 Canadian study of CB1 and CB2 receptors in monkeys concluded that manipulating the endocannabinoid system may help restore normal vision and protect the retina. 2.

“CBD and other cannabinoids have nice results in the reduction of anxiety and chronic pain. It is the workhorse of the cannabinoids. CBD is what does the work on reducing muscle spasms, pain, and inflammation,” said Mary Clifton, MD, who provides cannabis consultations in New York and through her virtual telemedicine portal.

Many ophthalmologists have fielded questions about marijuana use and eye health, particularly if they are in a state where medical marijuana is legal.

Between research and practice, for now, there is no CBD treatment recommended specifically for the eyes. “It is not an effective treatment for any ophthalmologic issues,” Dr. Tishler said. “Further, the high doses needed to see any result in illness are not achievable in eyecare.”

Ophthalmologists can use their growing knowledge of CBD to guide patient queries appropriately, particularly in states where marijuana has been legal for a longer length of time.

by Vanessa Caceres EyeWorld Contributing Writer.

References.

Under the 2018 Agriculture Act, hemp and CBD were made legal in all 50 states, although some in the medical field say there still is confusion over the specifics. Nonetheless, this has helped to set off a brigade of products and companies touting the health benefits of CBD. “This recent legislature significantly lightened the restrictions in industrial hemp, paving the way for CBD,” said Samantha Morrison.

Outside of the world of eyes, some researchers and patients have found some specific benefits for CBD. “Researchers have found that CBD has proven anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-aging, and neuroprotective properties,” Ms. Morrison said. “As a result, more and more people are turning to the organic compound for treating a wide variety of ailments, including inflammation, anxiety, pain, nausea, and even neurologic disorders.”

Although there’s a common perception that marijuana can help lower IOP, that is not a formal recommendation from ophthalmologists.

Ophthalmologist Ray Chan, MD, receives one or two questions a month about CBD or marijuana, mostly from patients who have a stronger interest in alternative medicine. If patients are using CBD for systemic health, he advises checking with their primary care doctor to find out if it’s helpful. If it’s for eye health, “I would advise them that there is no scientific evidence that it helps the eye. There are many better and cheaper medications to treat glaucoma,” he said.

Antonio DeRose, NASM CPT Green House Healthy Boulder, Colorado.

Ray Chan, MD Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital Arlington, Texas.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a chemical found in the cannabis plant. It does not make users “high,” and it has been used by many as an oil or infused into food, skin creams, and even gummies.