cbd and fertility

December 15, 2021 By admin Off

Sperm morphology was studied in hybrid mice of genotype (C57BL X C3H)F1 following treatment with specific cannabinoids. Mice were treated for 5 consecutive days with the specific cannabinoid; 35 days after the last treatment, epididymal sperm were scored in the light microscope and assessed in the scanning electron microscope. The animals treated with delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and cannabinol (CBN) had a statistically higher incidence of abnormal sperm than the controls. The incidence of abnormal sperm in the animals treated with cannabidiol (CBD) was not statistically different from the control value. The relative toxicity of the cannabinoids in these studies was delta9-THC greater than CBN greater than CBD. Normal sperm have a smooth kidney-shaped head with a prominent hook; abnormal sperm have shapes which include heads without hooks, banana-shaped heads, amorphous heads and folded heads.

The risks of taking CBD aren’t all clear. As with any supplement, tell your doctor you’re taking it. They may even have research and guidance to help you in meeting your health and fertility goals.

So much is still unknown at this point. More research needs to be done. But here’s what we’ve learned so far about how CBD impacts fertility.

We know very little right now about CBD affects fertility and pregnancy. Research on marijuana use has shown that smoking marijuana can decrease ovulation and IVF success. Research has also found that marijuana has a negative impact on male fertility, including significant reduction (30%) in sperm concentration and count. All of this research, however, included marijuana with THC.

The list of ailments that CBD can treat seems to grow by the day. If it can alleviate seizures, chronic pain and anxiety, surely it can help fertility, right? It’s a good question, but we’re far from having a clear answer.

The legal status of marijuana is complex and varies by state. Federally, it’s still illegal but in 2015 the FDA approved research on CBD. Currently, CBD is regulated as a supplement which makes it relatively easy to obtain (easier than Marijuana) but makes it medically more ambiguous as supplements don’t have strict regulations about concentration, dosage, etc. As CBD becomes more widely acceptable and researched, more and more are looking to it as a viable fertility supplement.

Forms of CBD.

CBD is short for cannabidiol and it is derived from the hemp plant. It is one of the active compounds in marijuana. It doesn’t cause any high and, so far, there is no evidence that CBD has harmful effects on health. In fact, CBD is reported to have therapeutic uses for a range of ailments, including:

When you can’t regulate dosage of a produce, it’s hard to regulate its safety or its effectiveness.

CBD has been studied much less and despite all the health claims coming from CBD dispensaries and online forums, there simply isn’t enough research to confirm that CBD can boost fertility or resolve infertility. There also isn’t enough research on its impact during pregnancy.

We don’t understand a lot about the complex endocannabinoid system (ECS) at this point–it’s a relatively recent discovery still being researched by experts. So far, they’ve linked it to a number of important processes in the body, including pain, immune system responses, sleep and the reproductive system. ECS receptors are what allow compounds like THC and CBD to interact with the body and do things like alleviate pain, inflammation, seizures and stress.

Right now, CBD is classified as a supplement. Supplements are not given a high level of scrutiny, which means labels can be misleading. One report showed that nearly half of CBD products contained more CBD than was listed on the label, and one-quarter had less. Nearly one-fifth of the products contained THC.

THC ( tetrahydrocannabinol) is the most active compound in marijuana. It’s what is responsible for causing the “high” typically associated with smoking marijuana.

The interesting thing about CBD, and one of the reasons it’s thought to be a good product for fertility, is that its chemical structure looks similar to some of the hormones our body produces called endocannabinoids.

Until we know more, here are a few things you can do to increase your chances of fertility:

Endocannabinoid receptors have been found in sperm and the female reproductive tract. Because of this, it’s thought that they can improve a sperm’s ability to fertilize an egg, boost ovarian function and follicle maturation. In short, that CBD can be a natural way to boost fertility with minimal negative side effects. There is yet to be strong evidence to support this theory.

Still, keep in mind that CBD is a supplement and not strictly regulated. It’s important that if you decide to take CBD, do your research and ensure that it’s the highest quality.

What is CBD?

There is still relatively little known about CBD and years more research until we know its efficacy and safety, especially when it comes to fertility and pregnancy.

Because so little research has been done, it’s hard to know all the side effects of taking CBD. Nausea, fatigue and irritability have been reported and can interact with certain other medications in a similar way to grapefruit juice. It can also raise levels of the blood thinner coumadin.

If you decide to use CBD, you have a whole range of options to choose from. Some are more dubious than others (CBD-infused water, for example). Some are cheaper, more concentrated, easier to swallow, faster-acting or more easily measured. However you choose to vape, swallow or apply, you have options. Here are some of the most popular:

There is still much more to learn about the endocannabinoid system, its role in fertility and how it interacts with (and is impacted by) CBD.

CBD may be helpful and it may not. Until we know for sure, use caution, do your research, and talk with your doctor.

CBD, Endocannabinoids and Fertility.