cbd aspirin interaction

December 15, 2021 By admin Off

CBD has the potential to interact with many other products, including over-the-counter medications, herbal products, and prescription medications. Some medications should never be taken with CBD; the use of other medications may need to be modified or reduced to prevent serious issues. The consequences of drug interactions also depend on many other factors, including the dose of CBD, the dose of another medication, and a person’s underlying health condition. Older adults are more susceptible to drug interactions because they often take multiple medications, and because of age-related physiological changes that affect how our bodies process medications.

The researchers further warned that while the list may be used as a starting point to identify potential drug interactions with marijuana or CBD oil, plant-derived cannabinoid products may deliver highly variable cannabinoid concentrations (unlike the FDA-regulated prescription cannabinoid medications previously mentioned), and may contain many other compounds that can increase the risk of unintended drug interactions.

Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine evaluated existing information on five prescription CBD and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) cannabinoid medications: antinausea medications used during cancer treatment (Marinol, Syndros, Cesamet); a medication used primarily for muscle spasms in multiple sclerosis (Sativex, which is not currently available in the US, but available in other countries); and an antiseizure medication (Epidiolex). Overall, the researchers identified 139 medications that may be affected by cannabinoids. This list was further narrowed to 57 medications, for which altered concentration can be dangerous. The list contains a variety of drugs from heart medications to antibiotics, although not all the drugs on the list may be affected by CBD-only products (some are only affected by THC). Potentially serious drug interactions with CBD included.

While generally considered safe, CBD may cause drowsiness, lightheadedness, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, and, in rare instances, damage to the liver. Taking CBD with other medications that have similar side effects may increase the risk of unwanted symptoms or toxicity. In other words, taking CBD at the same time with OTC or prescription medications and substances that cause sleepiness, such as opioids, benzodiazepines (such as Xanax or Ativan), antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines (such as Benadryl), or alcohol may lead to increased sleepiness, fatigue, and possibly accidental falls and accidents when driving. Increased sedation and tiredness may also happen when using certain herbal supplements, such as kava, melatonin, and St. John’s wort. Taking CBD with stimulants (such as Adderall) may lead to decreased appetite, while taking it with the diabetes drug metformin or certain heartburn drugs (such as Prilosec) may increase the risk of diarrhea.

Absolutely. Inhaled CBD gets into the blood the fastest, reaching high concentration within 30 minutes and increasing the risk of acute side effects. Edibles require longer time to absorb and are less likely to produce a high concentration peak, although they may eventually reach high enough levels to cause an issue or interact with other medications. Topical formulations, such as creams and lotions, may not absorb and get into the blood in sufficient amount to interact with other medications, although there is very little information on how much of CBD gets into the blood eventually. All of this is further complicated by the fact that none of these products are regulated or checked for purity, concentration, or safety.

Does the form of CBD matter?

Products containing cannabidiol (CBD) seem to be all the rage these days, promising relief from a wide range of maladies, from insomnia and hot flashes to chronic pain and seizures. Some of these claims have merit to them, while some of them are just hype. But it won’t hurt to try, right? Well, not so fast. CBD is a biologically active compound, and as such, it may also have unintended consequences. These include known side effects of CBD, but also unintended interactions with supplements, herbal products, and over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications.

Many drugs are broken down by enzymes in the liver, and CBD may compete for or interfere with these enzymes, leading to too much or not enough of the drug in the body, called altered concentration. The altered concentration, in turn, may lead to the medication not working, or an increased risk of side effects. Such drug interactions are usually hard to predict but can cause unpleasant and sometimes serious problems.

People considering or taking CBD products should always mention their use to their doctor, particularly if they are taking other medications or have underlying medical conditions, such as liver disease, kidney disease, epilepsy, heart issues, a weakened immune system, or are on medications that can weaken the immune system (such as cancer medications). A pharmacist is a great resource to help you learn about a potential interaction with a supplement, an herbal product (many of which have their own drug interactions), or an over-the-counter or prescription medication. Don’t assume that just because something is natural, it is safe and trying it won’t hurt. It very well might.

CBD can alter the effects of other drugs.

Doubling up on side effects.

Despite these ADEs, the researchers concluded that the effective dose of 750 mg of cannabidiol (approximately 20 mg/kg/day for a 75‐kg adult), was mostly well tolerated when co-administered with clobazam, stiripentol, or valproate and that ADEs only occurred in patients for which there was no dosage titration.

A lot of people think of metabolism in terms of how easily or slowly they gain and lose weight, often claiming to have a “fast” or “slow” metabolism. In scientific terms, this is what is known as the basal metabolic rate, or the amount of calories an individual requires in order to sustain normal body functions while at rest.

CBD is has become increasingly popular in recent years due to its wide range of therapeutic effects as well as its ability to relieve a host of symptoms effectively , but also to do so safely and with few side effects. And unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the other most abundant phytocannabinoid found in the cannabis plant, CBD is non-intoxicating and non-psychoactive – something that for many people is an undesirable yet unavoidable part of taking a high-THC containing cannabis extract.

Before we take a look at how CBD interacts with medications, first we need to understand how the body’s metabolism works in general, the systems involved in CBD metabolism, how CBD is metabolized and how CBD affects something called the Cytochrome P-450 system.

The extent to which CBD acts as a competitive inhibitor of the cytochrome P450 binding proteins is mainly dependent on how much CBD is ingested, the unique physiology of the individual as well as the type of CBD product used (e.g. CBD isolate vs. full-spectrum CBD extracts). This is due to these factors determining how tightly the CBD molecules bind to the active site of the metabolic enzyme, with increased and tighter bonds resulting in more competitive inhibition.

CBD and anticancer agents.

What this means in plain English is that CBD sort of “outcompetes” other medications when it comes to reaching first place for getting metabolized by the CYP enzymes. This, in essence, means that CBD deactivates the effects of all the other therapeutic compounds that pass through the CYP system.

How successful it is in its competition with other medicines depends on a few factors, but mostly the amount of CBD that enters into the bloodstream. If it’s not very much, it will have very little to no noticeable effect on the CYP activity and the majority of the medicine will be metabolized. On the other hand, if a large dose of CBD is taken, it will bind to a lot more of the site of enzyme activity and leave a lot more of the other medicine to not be metabolized.

In yet another such study, but with researchers this time looking into the clinical implications and importance of DDIs between anticancer agents and CBD in patients with cancer, the reviewers found that there was limited information available, with most of the data coming from in vitro studies and that the true in vivo implications are not well-known. This lead them to believe that erring on the side of caution is the best option, and that doctors and pharmacists should always consider the possibility of interactions and their consequences whenever they are aware of a patient using CBD products.

Similarly, a study investigating the potential ADEs and DDIs the researchers highlighted that medical CBD users under clinical supervision should be screened for potential DDIs and ADEs between CBD, other pharmacotherapies, and their underlying conditions. They also recommended that an increase in awareness is needed among the lay public who are recreational or consumer CBD users. Similarly, healthcare providers should also be made aware of the potential for DDIs and ADEs with CBD and strategically prescribe and manage patient regimens while also considering patient desires for complementary or alternative therapies.

There are also other medications known as “prodrugs” that first need to be metabolized into its therapeutic compounds as opposed to being a therapeutic compound in and of itself (like most medications). In other words, the inactive compound is ingested, and once in the body, it is processed into its active compound.

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In another study investigating the interactions between CBD and commonly used anti-epileptic drugs, concluded that, although serum levels of the drugs topiramate, rufinamide, and N‐desmethylclobazam were found when use in conjunction with and increased CBD dosages. However, all changes were within the accepted therapeutic range but did underscore the importance of monitoring serum AED levels and LFTs during treatment with CBD.

However, there are certain substances that have the ability to affect the way in which the CYP system processes compounds such as CBD that cause certain drugs to metabolize faster or slower than what they would normally have done.

For this reason, it is vital that you should consult your doctor or treating physician before using any CBD oil or product. Your doctor is not only able to advise you with regard to a possible CBD-drug interaction, but can also monitor the therapeutic as well as side effects of both the CBD and the medications you are on. Similarly, your doctor can also help you adjust the dosages of both the medication and CBD so you can take both simultaneously but also do so safely.

What Is Metabolism?

Let’s find out why.

Just like food has to go through this process, so too does a therapeutic compound such as CBD, but in what is more specifically called drug metabolism. Drug metabolism refers to the rate at which medications and other therapeutic compounds are broken down by the body into its individual metabolites and how long these metabolites stay in the body.

The safety profile of CBD is well established with study after study showing that it is well tolerated and safe to use, while at the same time rarely producing any serious side effects. Similarly, CBD is a compound that has a profound impact on a wide variety of systems within the body, which is what makes it such an effective therapeutic agent for so many conditions. But at the same time it is good to remember that it is also this, that is the reason why it has the potential to interact with other drugs and why CBD should be consumed with care and respect.

For instance, any therapeutic compound that is metabolized by the CYP system has the potential of being affected by CBD. One indication that your medicine might be metabolized by the CYP system is if your pharmacist told you not to eat grapefruit, or watercress or use St. John’s Wort or goldenseal supplements. However, this is by no means a solid test and you should always check with your pharmacist of doctor first (more on that later).

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As mentioned, CBD also has the ability to interact directly with the CYP system in the liver. Preclinical research is showing that the way in which CBD does is by binding to the site where the enzyme activity occurs acting as a “competitive inhibitor”, displacing its chemical competitors, and thus preventing the CYP system from metabolizing other compounds.

Understanding Metabolism.

For instance, the CBD based drug, EPIDIOLEX® approved in the United States for seizures associated with Lennox‐Gastaut and Dravet syndromes, is increasingly either being used as a supplementary treatment, or even replacing the traditionally used anti-epileptic drugs clobazam, and valproate, as well as stiripentol, topiramate, rufinamide, and N‐desmethylclobazam respectively.

According to the Indiana University Department of Medicine, pharmaceutical drugs and medications which could be contraindicated for use with CBD include:

When the CYP system is affected in this way by CBD, it both changes and the way in which certain other drugs are metabolized as well as prevent a lot of the drug to be metabolized. When this happens, it leads to higher levels of other drug compounds to remain in the body at a single time.

Explained very simplistically, when food is eaten, it is broken down by the liver into its individual compounds in order for it to be used by the body. So, for example, carbohydrates are broken down into sugars, fats into triglycerides, and proteins into amino acids. From there, the metabolism, under the control of chemicals called enzymes, transforms these compounds into metabolites that can then be used by the body, for instance as fuel for cellular processes or as building blocks for various systems and tissues.

The above mentioned list of drugs that could interact with CBD is by no means exhaustive and does not include all the medications on which CBD may have an interaction with. Similarly, not all the medication categories listed above will necessarily cause and interaction (although if you are taking one of these medications it is recommended to rather err on the side of caution).

One such prodrug for example is codeine which is metabolized into morphine. Similarly, lisdexamfetamine under the brand names Vyvanse and Concerta are two other popular ADHD medications which also fall into this category.

However, in addition to breaking compounds down into metabolites, is also has one other very specific and important role it plays during this metabolic process – the detoxification and excretion of foreign drugs (called xenobiotics) and other types of toxic substances.