cbd oil kroger ohio

December 15, 2021 By admin Off

The Food and Drug Administration said CBD-infused products run the gamut of human drugs, dietary supplements, conventional foods, animal foods and drugs, and cosmetics.

Kroger joins national retailers across the country such as CVS and Walgreens in selling CBD topical products. CBD oil will be sold in Louisville-area stores in Kentucky and Indiana, according to a spokesperson.

The Enquirer has also reached out to the Cincinnati division for comment and timing.

“We will not be selling ingestible at this time. We are offering our customers a highly-curated selection of topical products like lotions, oils, balms and creams that are infused with hemp-derived CBD,” Louisville division’s spokeswoman Erin Grant said.

The Louisville division – which covers parts of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois –will begin selling a “curated selection” of topical hemp-derived CBD products in select stores and online in the coming weeks, a spokesperson said.

What is CBD oil?

Rachel Hurst, corporate affairs manager for the Kroger Michigan division told the Detriot Free Press will begin selling cannabidiol-infused products at stores in several states.

CBD, also known as cannabidiol, is derived from cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) and its components.

However, a bill to legalize hemp and hemp-derived CBD is moving quickly through the Ohio Statehouse in large part because of complaints about recent crackdowns on CBD.

USA TODAY reported that CBD often comes from a cannabis plant known as hemp, which is defined by the U.S. government as having less than 0.3% THC, the compound that causes marijuana’s mind-altering effect. CBD doesn’t cause that high, but fans of the products claim benefits including relief for pain and anxiety.

“CBD is a naturally-occurring and non-intoxicating compound that has promising benefits and is permitted within federal and state regulations. Our limited selection of hemp-derived CBD topical products is from suppliers that have been reviewed for quality and safety,” a statement from Kroger said.

State law doesn’t differentiate between hemp and marijuana, and the Ohio State Pharmacy Board clarified last August that CBD falls under the purview of state’s medical marijuana program.

You could soon buy CBD oil at Kentucky Kroger stores, according to the Cincinnati-based grocery giant, but you will have to wait to buy it in Ohio.

Ohio retailers have pulled CBD products from their shelves – or been asked to pull them by local officials – in recent months.

Kroger’s offerings have no THC content, Hurst told the Detroit News, and have been reviewed for quality and safety. Prices will range from $3.99 to $59.99 in Michagain. Brand names were not immediately available.

Why not Ohio?

CBD will likely not hit Ohio shelves at the same time as it will in Kentucky and Indiana.

Senate Bill 57 would set up a framework for regulating hemp cultivation and processing, which includes extracting the compound cannabidiol, or CBD.

“Cannabis contains more than 80 biologically active chemical compounds, including the two best-known compounds: delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). If one of these compounds, or the plant itself, is added to a food or cosmetic, marketed as a drug or otherwise added to an FDA-regulated product in interstate commerce, then it falls within FDA’s jurisdiction,” Acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless said at the hearing.

Kroger will sell hemp-derived CBD items such as lotions, balms, oils and creams in 945 stores, Kristal Howard, head of corporate communications and media relations at Kroger, said Tuesday. She did not name the brands that will be sold.

“Like many retailers, we are starting to offer our customers a highly curated selection of topical products like lotions, balms, oils and creams that are infused with hemp-derived CBD,” Howard said in a statement. “CBD is a naturally occurring and non-intoxicating compound that has promising benefits and is permitted within federal and state regulations. Our limited selection of hemp-derived CBD topical products is from suppliers that have been reviewed for quality and safety.”

News of Kroger’s CBD product distribution emerged this week in published reports. Howard said the rollout has begun on the West Coast, and the products will be at all 945 stores before the end of June.

The CBD products will be carried at stores in Kroger’s Atlanta, Cincinnati, Columbus, Michigan, Central, Louisville, Delta, Nashville, Mid-Atlantic, Roundy’s (Mariano’s and Pick ‘n Save), Dillons, King Soopers, Fry’s, Fred Meyer, QFC and Smith’s divisions.

While various CBD offerings continue to make their way into stores, many retailers remain uncertain about the regulatory framework regarding the sale and labeling of hemp-containing products. Scientific research on CBD’s purported health benefits also is still in its early stages.

“Late last year, the federal scheduling of cannabis changed. The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, or the Farm Bill, removed hemp — meaning cannabis or derivatives of cannabis with a very low THC content (below 0.3% by dry weight) — from the CSA’s [Federal Controlled Substances Act’s] definition of marijuana. As a result, while marijuana remains a Schedule I drug, hemp is no longer a controlled substance under federal law,” he explained.

At the hearing, Peter Matz, food and health policy director at the Food Marketing Institute (FMI), urged the FDA to act swiftly to provide retailers more clarity and create a pathway for the “legal and appropriate sale” of hemp and hemp-derived products. He noted that there’s already “staggering” demand for CBD products ranging from food, beverages and dietary supplements to topical items like creams and lotions.

Under current law, CBD and THC can’t be added to a food or marketed as a dietary supplement, Sharpless noted.

The Kroger Co. confirmed that it plans to roll out cannabidiol (CBD) topical products to stores in 17 states.

“There are real risks associated with both those substances, and critical questions remain about the safety of their widespread use in foods and dietary supplements, as well as other consumer products — including cosmetics, which are subject to a separate regulatory framework. And given the new interest in marketing cannabis products across the range of areas FDA regulates, we will need to carefully evaluate how all these pieces fit together in terms of how consumers might access cannabis products,” he said. “Nowhere is this truer than with CBD. While we have seen an explosion of interest in products containing CBD, there is still much that we don’t know.”

On May 31, the Food and Drug Administration held a lengthy public hearing to get a bead on current scientific data and information about the safety, manufacturing, product quality, marketing, labeling and sale of products containing cannabis or cannabis derivatives.

“I am here to convey the seriousness of the regulatory ambiguity facing our member companies and their customers each day as consumer demand for products containing hemp and hemp-derivatives continues to grow, as does the commercial availability of such products — especially those which count CBD as an ingredient,” Matz said in his remarks. “While most of the stakeholders participating today understand the Farm Bill did not alter FDA’s authority over the use of such ingredients in FDA-regulated products, the fact is there is mass confusion in the marketplace for the public, for suppliers and retailers, and also for state regulators and law enforcement.”

A 2017 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found 70% of CBD products were mislabeled. Researchers used an independent lab to test 84 products from 31 companies.

CBD often comes from a cannabis plant known as hemp, which is defined by the U.S. government as having less than 0.3% THC. That’s important because THC is what causes marijuana’s mind-altering effect.

“They are vulnerable and really hoping to feel better,” said Karen Hande, a nurse practitioner at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville.

ARE CBD LABELS ACCURATE?

CBD is one of more than 100 compounds found in marijuana. It’s extracted using alcohol or carbon dioxide in factories. It’s added to oils, mixed into creams and lotions and sold in candies and liquid drops.

One exception: For two rare seizure disorders, the evidence for CBD was strong enough to convince the FDA to approve GW Pharmaceutical’s drug Epidiolex, which contains a purified form.

If you believe the hype, CBD treats pain, relieves anxiety and both helps you sleep and keeps you focused.

Only drugs that have been reviewed by the FDA as safe and effective can make claims that they treat or prevent diseases or medical conditions. Many CBD producers attempt to sidestep the issue by using only vague language about general health and well-being.

The FDA announced Tuesday it has sent warning letters to three companies marketing products with what outgoing Commissioner Scott Gottlieb called “egregious, over-the-line claims” for CBD’s effects on cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, fibromyalgia and drug addiction. Among the cited examples: “CBD successfully stopped cancer cells” in cervical cancer.

In stating its position, the FDA cited a provision of the law prohibiting food makers from using active drug ingredients or those still undergoing substantial research. But the agency doesn’t have the resources to police all the CBD products that are already available, said Marc Scheineson, a former FDA official.

What you buy may contain much less CBD than the label states — or much more. It may include more THC than you want and it may be contaminated with mold or pesticides. Ask to see testing reports.

CBD doesn’t get people high, although it may be calming. Keep in mind some CBD products may contain THC, whether or not the label says so.

IS IT A MIRACLE CURE?

Gottlieb said the agency “won’t tolerate this kind of deceptive marketing to vulnerable patients.”

A product labeled as containing 100 milligrams of CBD may only have 5 milligrams or it may have 200, said Bonn-Miller, now an adviser for a company that sells CBD and other cannabis products. He did not work in the industry when he did the research.

Widely sold online, CBD now is going mainstream with major retailers offering salves and balms for the skin. Prices range from $12 to $150 an ounce at high-end shops.

People drug tested for work, addiction programs or because they take prescription opioids should take note: CBD products have caused people to fail urine drug screens.

CBD research is planned or underway for cancer, autism, diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, chronic pain, alcoholism with PTSD and psychiatric conditions. Results will take years, but some people aren’t waiting.

WHAT IS CBD?

ANY SIDE EFFECTS?

CINCINNATI, Ohio (WCMH) — Kroger stores in several states will soon begin selling topical Cannabidiol-infused products.

“They’re not going to pull a thousand products from the market,” he said.

C.J. Montgomery of Nutra Pure LLC of Vancouver, Washington, said the company has revised some of wording on its website to try to address the FDA’s concerns.

IS IT LEGAL?

Marijuana itself is illegal under federal law; most states that have legalized it allow marijuana-infused foods and candies, called edibles.

Scant research means not much is known about side effects either. In epilepsy research, CBD changed the way the body processed other drugs. That suggests CBD could interact with medications in ways we still don’t know about.

Skin creams and cosmetics may be on safer footing with the FDA, but that too remains uncertain, said Camille Gourdet of RTI International, a nonprofit research institute in Durham, North Carolina. Though cosmetics aren’t subject to premarket approval by the FDA, they could run afoul of regulations if they make specific health claims.

The FDA’s authority is over interstate commerce, and local officials have taken differing approaches. In New York, Los Angeles and elsewhere, officials are warning eateries to stop selling it in food and drinks. Maine passed a law allowing it in foods and other products in the state.

CBD-infused products are available at stores in nearby states, like Indiana and Kentucky. Stores in Ohio, however, will not carry the items due to state regulations prohibiting the sale of hemp-derived CBD products, WLWT reported.

For now, the agency has said CBD is not allowed as an ingredient in food, drinks or dietary supplements.