green relief cbd oil

December 15, 2021 By admin Off

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The Green Team.

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The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The efficacy of these products has not been confirmed by FDA-approved research. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All information presented here is not meant as a substitute for or alternative to information from healthcare practitioners. Please consult your healthcare professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act requires this notice.

The Green Team.

How Terpenes Work in On The Green CBD Products.

Jha, Massel and McNamara allege they found numerous transactions linked to the founders that did not relate to Green Relief’s actual operations.

The allegations have not yet been proven, nor has the Financial Post verified them.

“These allegations are false, without merit, and constitute a malicious defamation against each of our clients,” the email stated.

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A licensed cannabis producer facing significant financial issues is alleging the company’s own founders misappropriated approximately $14 million from its coffers, leaving hundreds of shareholders with little to show for their investments.

Medical marijuana growing at Green Relief’s aquaponics facility in January 2019. Photo by Carlos Osorio/Reuters files.

“We have cleaned up. The company is in the best shape it has been since I took over,” Jha said.

“I vehemently deny that I committed a fraud on behalf of Green Relief, misappropriated funds of Green Relief, or have been unjustly enriched at the expense of Green Relief, and take offence at the suggestion. I would take note McNamara makes no effort to list the far greater amounts owing to me or the financial assistance that I provided to Green Relief throughout,” Lyn stated in the affidavit.

In a move to shore up immediate cash for Green Relief, Jha announced that he would be giving back four million of his own shares to the company, and called on shareholders to purchase those shares at The company’s investigation, led by chief financial officer Stephen Massel and general counsel Bota McNamara, spanned months and involved interviews with current and former employees, former auditors, contractors and suppliers, according to Green Relief executives..50, in order to generate $2 million to keep Green Relief afloat.

My goal is not to worry about what people have done in the past. My goal is to advance Green Relief and protect your investments.

“As CEO, my goal is not to seek justice. My goal is not to worry about what people have done in the past. My goal is to advance Green Relief and protect your investments,” said Jha, a Toronto-based neurosurgeon specializing in concussions, who became Green Relief’s CEO in March 2019.

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Regarding Green Relief’s allegation that the Bravos used company money to pay for the construction of a new home, Lyn stated the private home was an “integral part of Green Relief’s plan for future offices” and that “all renovations were done with the express knowledge of the directors, officers and employees of Green Relief.”

A sworn affidavit by McNamara entered as part of the injunction application included a letter sent by McNamara to the Bravos’ lawyers in December 2019 listing numerous fraud allegations, along with hundreds of supporting documents.

“We feel betrayed and embarrassed. Betrayed, because we did put a lot of trust into the company and people convinced us that it was a good idea. How do you now tell your family where your money went?” he added.

Aquaponics is an agricultural process that uses aquatic animals and hydroponics to grow plants. Green Relief used fish waste to fertilize cannabis plants that it grew in water.

Jha told shareholders at the Jan. 14 meeting that the company’s attorneys were in the process of informing “the relevant regulatory bodies” about the alleged misappropriation of funds, though he did not specify which regulatory bodies have been notified.

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Jha joined the company in early 2019 through Green Relief’s acquisition of his research firm, Bodhi Research & Development, and he said that’s when he learned Green Relief was struggling.

Since 2013, Green Relief had received $59.2 million in funding from various sources, primarily shareholders, and had used $45.1 million for long and short-term expenses — $14.1 million was unaccounted for, according to Massel and McNamara.

Green Relief and Lyn Bravo are now in the midst of a legal dispute, stemming from an injunction application filed by the company seeking to prevent her and “her family, friends and associates” from entering Green Relief’s premises.

“These were assets that were paid for by the company, but these assets aren’t in our name, they are in other people’s names,” McNamara told shareholders.

“They were making payments from Green Relief, using fake invoices, that had nothing to do with the company,” Massel alleged.

Two Green Relief investors who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity said they were keen to invest after touring the company’s aquaponics facility, and being told the company would end up going public.